Insurgency

The Year of the Drone

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • Katherine Tiedemann,
  • New America Foundation
February 24, 2010

The bomber, a Jordanian doctor linked to al Qaeda, detonated his explosives on December 30, 2009, at an American base in Khost in eastern Afghanistan, killing himself and seven CIA officers and contractors who were operating at the heart of the covert program overseeing U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan’s volatile northwestern tribal regions.

Lashkar-e-Taiba in Perspective

  • By Stephen Tankel
February 25, 2010

In 2006, the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba entered the Afghan theater, necessitating its increased presence in Pakistan’s North-West Frontier Province and Federally Administered Tribal Areas. The group is often mentioned during discussions of the Punjabi Taliban, militants from Punjabi jihadi groups, who arrived in large numbers at approximately the same time. But these militants follow the Deobandi school of Islam and are close to the Afghan and Pakistani Taliban.

Al-Qaeda Central

  • By Barbara Sude
February 25, 2010

A U.S.

Manhunt: From Saddam to bin Laden

Friday, February 26, 2010 - 9:30am

On February 26, Slate’s Chris Wilson, Colonel Jim Hikey, Scott Helfstein, and “Matthew Alexander” (a pseundonym) explored the surprisingly hi-tech hunt for Iraq's dictator in 2003, and ways such tools continue to change U.S. war-fighting. The panelists were introduced by New America President Steve Coll. The event was moderated by Peter Bergen, Co-Director of the Counterterrorism Strategy Initiative.

Slate, New America Partner to Focus on Transformative Technologies

February 18, 2010

The New America Foundation and Slate magazine today announced a new partnership, focusing on emerging technologies and their transformative effects on society and public policy.

Central to the partnership is the "Future Tense" event series, which brings together issue experts and provocative thinkers from all disciplines to look beyond today's headlines.  Both Slate and New America will be complementing these discussions with original web content, and exploring new ways to continue the conversations online.

Why Taliban Capture Could Be Huge

  • By
  • Brian Fishman,
  • New America Foundation
February 16, 2010 |

The capture of the Afghan Taliban's operational commander, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, in the Pakistani city of Karachi is a signature success for the United States' effort in Afghanistan and Pakistan, but it does not indicate that the insurgent movement will collapse.

In the short run, local Taliban commanders will be able to maintain the movement's operational effectiveness against U.S. and NATO troops. Over the long term, however, increased collaboration between American and Pakistani intelligence agencies could prove debilitating for the movement.

Al-Qaeda Central

Thursday, February 25, 2010 - 9:30am

On February 25, 2010, the New America Foundation hosted a panel of experts to analyze Al-Qaeda and exchange their observations. Paul Cruickshank recently examined the testimonies of Western militants and built up, for the audience, a description of Al-Qaeda’s safe haven in Pakistan while Barbara Sude discussed Al-Qaeda’s leadership and structure. Peter Bergen, in a joint-study with Katherine Tiedemann, recently evaluated the effectiveness of drone strikes in Pakistan and presented their findings to the group.

Kenya Vice President Kalonzo Musyoka on the Crisis on the Kenya-Somali Border

February 3, 2010
New America Foundation/American Strategy Director Steve Clemons and Kenya Vice President Kalonzo Musyoka discussed a growing crisis along the Kenyan-Somali border. Vice-President Musyoka spoke about the build up of Islamic radicals moving into Somalia and Yemen from Pakistan, the problem of over-emphasizing military responses in failing states and the need for the international community to make a more sustained commitment to the region. Musyoka also touched upon Kenyan perceptions of U.S. President Barack Obama.

Yemen on the Brink?

  • By Barak Barfi
January 25, 2010

Executive Summary

Status of al Qaeda in Yemen. Yemen is dominated by powerful tribes, some members of which shelter al Qaeda in order to leverage their power vis-à-vis other political actors. Tribal support for al Qaeda is thus political rather than ideological in nature. But despite this support, the relationship between al Qaeda and the tribes is sometimes strained, and al Qaeda is unpopular with the Yemeni people.

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