Media

The Net Delusion

January 4, 2011

“The revolution will be Twittered!” declared journalist Andrew Sullivan after protests erupted in Iran in June 2009. Yet for all the talk about the democratizing power of the Internet, regimes in Iran and China are as stable and repressive as ever. In fact, authoritarian governments are effectively using the Internet to suppress free speech, hone their surveillance techniques, disseminate cutting-edge propaganda, and pacify their populations with digital entertainment. Could the recent Western obsession with promoting democracy by digital means backfire?

In Defense of DDoS

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
December 14, 2010 |

Judging by the last two weeks, being an enemy of Julian Assange is only marginally less stressful than being Julian Assange. Amazon, PayPal, MasterCard, and Visa, which all moved to cut ties with Assange's WikiLeaks after the site's release of diplomatic cables, have been the targets of distributed denial-of-service attacks from a group that calls itself "Anonymous." There is nothing fancy going on here. DDoS attacks simply aim to send more traffic to a target site than it can handle, slowing it down or making it temporarily unavailable.

Telecom's Future: Lessons from the Ghost of Policy Past

December 9, 2010
Publication Image

At a Nov. 30 event at Columbia University, “Big Media: Pro and Con,” Journalism School Dean Nicholas Lemann analogized media policy to a football field: Just as the size and shape of the field dictates the way the game is played, so too does media policy dictate the development of American telecommunications. And on the heels of FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski’s announcement last week of a new net neutrality proposal, we see more clearly than ever that government legislation and regulation are crucial to this field. In that vein, Columbia Journalism School Prof. Richard R. John’s book Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunications, published in May, makes the case that policy intervention has been commonplace throughout American history with a sweeping survey of the history of electrical communications from the early Republic to the modern day.

Telecom's Future: Lessons from the Ghost of Policy Past

December 9, 2010
Publication Image

At a Nov. 30 event at Columbia University, “Big Media: Pro and Con,” Journalism School Dean Nicholas Lemann analogized media policy to a football field: Just as the size and shape of the field dictates the way the game is played, so too does media policy dictate the development of American telecommunications. And on the heels of FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski’s announcement last week of a new net neutrality proposal, we see more clearly than ever that government legislation and regulation are crucial to this field. In that vein, Columbia Journalism School Prof. Richard R. John’s book Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunications, published in May, makes the case that policy intervention has been commonplace throughout American history with a sweeping survey of the history of electrical communications from the early Republic to the modern day.

Reimagining the Mission of International Broadcasting

December 8, 2010
Photo Credit: Radio Rover (Flickr)

Leading lights in the international broadcasting space will be congregating at New America this afternoon to weigh in on the subject of International Broadcasting and

Cyber Guerrillas Can Help U.S.

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
December 6, 2010 |

Just two weeks before WikiLeaks released its diplomatic cables, Alec Ross, a leading proponent of all things digital at the US State Department, delivered an excitable talk at an internet conference in Chile. The title was the "battle between open and closed societies"; Mr Ross argued that openness always wins. Yet barely six minutes in he managed to infuriate his Latin American audience by saying that the network "was the Che Guevara of the 21st century".

WikiLeaks, Amazon and the New Threat to Internet Speech

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
December 2, 2010 |

In the physical world, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is a wanted man. In the virtual world, his website is under attack and on the run.

There isn't much question that the person who obtained the WikiLeaks cables from a classified U.S. government network broke U.S. law and should expect to face the consequences. The legal rights of a website that publishes material acquired from that person, however, are much more controversial.

Media Policy and the Digital Future: In the Shadow of Bigness

December 2, 2010

Each day as we log on to the Internet, use our cell phones for more than just talking, watch television, and connect on social networks, we are part of a small group of giants.

Where's MPI?: Media Policy Initiative Week in Review

November 23, 2010
Publication Image

Before we all become completely distracted by the Thanksgiving turkey, here is a pre-holiday rundown of MPI’s many activities.

The End of Internet History?

  • By
  • Tim Wu,
  • New America Foundation
November 23, 2010 |

My book, "The Master Switch" asks a simple, age-old question: Is history destined to repeat itself? Is the great revolutionary medium of our times, the Internet, destined to follow the path of its ancestors, radio and the telephone, a path of increasing consolidation and uncompetitiveness, leading over time, to slow stagnation? Or is there something fundamentally different about our times that will keep the network open and competitive for the foreseeable future?

Programs:
Syndicate content